Monthly Archives: November 2014

Early snow

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snowWe had our first snow day of the year! We take the day off school if our neighbors do, because it just doesn’t seem fair not to. I think I’m going to like snow days this year because all children old enough to want to play in the snow are old enough to play in the snow by themselves while I sip coffee and watch over the toddler inside the warm house. It seemed a little odd to be hauling out the snow gear in November (this is Kentucky, not Vermont!), but at least last year’s sturdy boots still fit.

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After my rosy-cheeked big kids finished their snow man and their hot chocolate, they turned a big box into a car. How is that a big box can be more fun than any toy?

10687065_10205313835111208_1337218845321174890_nAnd a little homeschool funny. Dorothy was asked to think about a time she’d been given a chance, or if she couldn’t think of one, to write a note to her teacher about a chance she’d like to be given. Apparently she couldn’t think of an opportunity she’d already had (really?!), so she wrote this to me: “Dear Mommy, I would like to not have so much school work or I want a coupple [sic] days off once in a while. I would also appreciate it if I could do more reading than school work each day. I would totaly [sic] like it if we could do more science and more work-book stuff than curriculum stuff. I love you and hope all of these changes will happen. Sincerely, Dorothy.” She giggled like a fiend while I read it, which meant that it was ok for me to laugh too. Imp! She basically is saying, “I’d like you to leave me alone to read my own books, or for school I’d like to do just the parts where I read, you read to me, or we do review. I don’t want to answer questions about the reading or learn mathematics.” Nice. And if you’re laughing now too, you’re welcome. 🙂

What a mess: One mother’s response to the latest mommy wars

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wipes

I think I need to weigh in on the articles and blog posts that have been circulating in the latest round of the “mommy wars,”–whatever that is. I’m not big on making sweeping judgments about other people’s lifestyle choices. Feel happy and fulfilled and like you’ve got your financial shit together working outside the home? Great! You’re a good mom, and you’ve probably got awesome shoes. Feel happy and fulfilled and like you’ve got your financial shit together while staying out of the paid workforce and raising your kids? Great! You’re a good mom too, but you’ve probably got less awesome shoes. (Like me.) Send your kid to public or private school? Great! They are probably going to turn out fine, and they leave your house for eight hours a day, which is clearly a good idea. Homeschool your kid? Great! They are probably going to turn out fine too, and I’m sure you have a reason for keeping them there that makes their relentless presence in your house worthwhile.

Now moving on to the details. Lately these so-called “wars” seem to have descended from these more obvious issues and into the petty realm of party and event planning, and whether or not you keep your house clean. I think these articles that bash a “culture” of Pinterest-obsessed mothers who plan picturesque birthday parties or set leprechaun traps are meant to make mothers who opt not to do these things feel better, but is that really the way to do it? Why are we giving other mothers a hard time at all? No mother is out there posting cupcakes on Pinterest or scrubbing her kitchen floor to make you feel inadequate, nor should they be asked to stop because of your negative response. What your house looks like is between you and the other people who live in it. It’s not about the articles or the bloggers or the playdate mamas. There is no vast conspiracy of military-industrial anything telling you to plan Pinterest holiday events or keep your mail slots beautiful. You do what feels right at your house, and let’s stop spilling ink on whether or not it’s a contest.

All the articles about how the Pinterest stuff takes it too far, and no one else’s house is really that clean, and every birthday party doesn’t have to be magical, and that’s not even really a holiday, blah, blah, undermine other mothers. Because mothers who plan elaborate parties love their children. Mothers who don’t plan elaborate parties love their children. Mothers who use Pinterest ideas to turn small holidays into big moments of wonder love their children. Mothers who would rather eat roadkill than handle glitter love their children. Mothers who are too up to their eyeballs in case work, or shift work, or depression, or a dirty novel to even notice this conversation is going on love their children. Making a plea to other mothers to stop doing whatever they are doing–whether it is icing gorgeous cupcakes, or cleaning their house before a playdate, or having a job, or not having a job–is not an act of sisterhood. It is trying to take another mother’s behavior and make it about you.

Maybe what we need is to stop talking about the behavior of other mothers. Maybe all the moms just need a nice shot in the arm of self-confidence and the space to get a grip on what is important to them and what is not, and then mind their own business. If you know you love your children, and you make your decisions based on what is right for you and for them, then what everyone else is doing is just not relevant.  And housekeeping, for pete’s sake, why is this a conversation in 2014? It’s not a ranked activity–it’s your own private thing. The dirty underwear on your floor is, quite literally, your dirty underwear (or to be perfectly honest it’s probably your toddler’s) and if it bothers you that much go and pick it up. And if it doesn’t then literally shut the front door and no one else will see it. No one on Pinterest or the blog world or uninvited to your house is going to know about it.

By the same token, if looking at photographs of “perfect” birthday parties or Hallmark holiday celebrations on Pinterest or blogs is some sort of trigger for you, why don’t you stay off Pinterest and the blogs? You are a grown-up. Read bodice-rippers or dirty fan-fiction in the time you would have spent “getting ideas” about how everyone else’s life is better than yours. That always puts me in a better mood, and I never end up spending $50 on new art supplies next day. But I’d like to point out that the problem is probably not that other people are posting blogs or Pinterest photos of parties and celebrations, but that you are responding to them by feeling inadequate. I doubt that anyone ever iced cupcakes just to make someone else feel bad. Get a backbone and say “I want to make these cupcakes” and then really do it. Or say, “I am never going to make these cupcakes, and I’m having a negative reaction to seeing other people’s cupcakes, so I need to work on my self-esteem. I’m going to remind myself that I’m a mother who loves her children, that quality mothering and cupcake baking are not actually correlated. Now I’m going to shut down this browser and stay away from cupcake photos. I will not resort to the middle-school coping mechanism of running down the mama who baked the cupcakes (who also loves her children) to make myself feel better.”

I’m a cupcake-baker. I have cute birthday parties for my kids. Sometimes I even have cute half-birthday celebrations for my kids and blog about them. Sometimes we totally forget about the kids’ half-birthdays, and if anyone happens to remember at the last moment we run to the corner gas station and buy packaged cupcakes. Or we don’t even bother. Sometimes my house is beautifully clean and my mail slots are worthy of Pinterest. Sometimes random piles of crap appear all over my house and there is no clean laundry and my mail slots overflow. Sometimes I like to browse ideas on Pinterest. Sometimes I like to read dirty novels and pay no attention to applesauce on the floor or the yogurt being dumped on the dog or the fact that yesterday was a Hallmark holiday I missed. And I LOVE MY KIDS. I don’t judge myself based on anyone else’s criteria because I am comfortable in my own skin. That is a gift, I realize, but it is also a choice. I honor that you are a good mother because you love your kids. I am not going to judge the choices you make about working or schooling or (the biggie!) crafty holiday decorations. I’m not going to ask you to lie about your house, or to lie about lying about it. Because you are your own person, and, like me, you probably keep your house the way it needs to be right now for you. And you love your kids.

Now I’m a little embarrassed that in a state where slightly more than a third of children live in poverty I have just spend an hour acknowledging any importance in the petty “mommy wars,” in which well-fed mothers argue over things that don’t really matter. Except that niceness always matters. And making some theoretically heroic summons of sisterhood for mothers to stop fussing over Hallmark holidays (if they enjoy it) or planning cutesy birthday parties (if they want to) or having a tidy house (or lying about it?) isn’t nice. It just isn’t about you. Take it or leave it. It didn’t become a contest until someone who felt like they were losing started whining about calling off the contest. You can decide what to look at it and what to avoid. Live you own life. Love your children. Go talk about things that matter. And if you have something to say to another mother let it be positive.

I’ll start. I honor you and the mother that you are. I don’t care what your house looks like, even if it is spectacular. I don’t care if you are baking picture-perfect cupcakes (though if you are and you have extra, my favorite flavor is lemon). I don’t care if you are picking up cupcakes from the gas station (though if you are and you have extra, my favorite flavor is that waxy orange with the white squiggle on top). I hope you are in an employment situation that feels right to you. I hope your children are in educational situations that feel right to you. I hope you have the self-confidence to look at ideas and tuck away what you like and discard the rest. I hope you realize how beautiful you are. I hope you realize that you are the right parent for your child. And I know you love your children.

Peace, Mama!

Cardinal Girl

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card-girl

I’d like to say thank you to my new visitors from the Right Start Mathematics Facebook page! I was so pleased to have my bags featured there. If you’re looking for more of my posts about homeschooling you can use this link, or go directly to my post about why we homeschool, which includes one of my favorite pictures of our schooling life–in which we are using Right Start Math!

Today I’m sharing another new baby outfit. Daphne needs to show her support for the home team this winter, and has outgrown the baby spiritwear she shared with her brother. I bought a cardinal embroidery pattern for my machine and made her a little personalized bodysuit, then made up some soft and sweet red corduroy pants which should be a good basic for her this holiday season as well. I didn’t use a pattern for the pants because I find I get the best results by just cutting around a pair that already fits her well.

Right Start Math bags

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Since last spring I’ve had this niggling feeling that I should better organize our math manipulatives. We use the homeschool math curriculum Right Start Mathematics, which is a good fit for me and my third-grader, and it comes with lots and lots of little bits and pieces and sets of cards. I have a small secretary desk in my living room that is dedicated to holding our math supplies. The problem was that I couldn’t close it anymore because it was so crammed full with our manipulatives, cards, and the various sandwich bags or dog-eared envelopes I was employing to hold them. I bought some white zippers in bulk and used canvas left over from our field trip bags to make 13 zipper bags for our math supplies. I took the time to embroider a label onto each bag, which seemed like “OMG, have I really become a person who embroiders labels on to homemade canvas bags to hold math manipulatives?” but yes, it seems I have. Assuming we stick with this curriculum, I’ll be using these supplies for many more years, and I’d have been mad if my previous disorganized system had caused me to have to re-purchase supplies I could have kept track of better. I am not, under any circumstances, going to follow this project up by crocheting a cozy for our abacus. So here we go. Hopefully these bags and I will have quite a future together, and it’ll be worth the time spent when my current toddler learns her fractions with their help. And if there is just a little voice in the back of my brain that says, “really? You made special bags to hold math supplies?” I’ll just tell it to shut up. In Latin, because that’s all homeschool-y, right?

Gloves, again

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Do you want to know how to feel like an idiot? Here’s one way. First, you make really pretty brown mitts for yourself and blog about them. Next, you lose the gloves the first time you actually wear them. Finally, you keep asking people if they’ve seen your brown gloves, because you are missing a pair, and listen to them say, “you mean the ones from your blog?” Because I promise, then you will feel like an idiot. Yes, I made gloves. Yes, I blogged about them. Yes, I lost them. I am an idiot.

I’m still in hopes that the brown gloves will turn up eventually, but in the meantime the temperature is dropping and I really do want mitts to wear with my orange coat. I was out of the nice brown merino I made the first pair from, but a friend just sent a bag of hand-me-down yarn and there was some soft acrylic in a nice oatmeal color, so I found a simpler (quicker, larger gauge) pattern and made a new pair of mitts. I didn’t put long cuffs on these, and they only took a couple hours per glove. Now I feel slightly better in that I have gloves again, but still sort of mad in that I wasted four hours of my week re-making myself gloves when I’m actually supposed to be working on Christmas gifts. A warm idiot is better than a cold idiot, right? Oy!

Fall crochet projects round 2

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Daphne has been wearing some of Worth’s fall crocheted hand-me-downs lately. Here is Worth wearing the same hat and sweater in 2010. The hat is just a simple crocheted beanie with a stem added to the stop. The sweater is made from this Wool Hooded Cardigan pattern from the book Natural Crochet for Babies and Toddlers and is done in Knitpicks’ merino wool. I love these sweet little soft and cozy fall goodies; so glad I got to squeeze on one more baby wearing them!

Budget baby sewing

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Little baby outfits like this one are so satisfying because they don’t take much time or many materials. A small amount of baby flannel became basic baby pants, to which I added a leg ruffle for fun. Then I made a small applique with a scrap of fabric and sewed it onto a plain bodysuit. I’ve done a similar thing to bodysuits that were given to us but I didn’t like the design on, but this one was just a nice, soft, plain white one. The pants were a little too long, so I’ve turned up a basted hem on the ruffle, which makes it a little stuff, but I think I should be able to take it back out easily in a couple months when she’s taller, and then these pants should be favorites all winter.